Filter content by area of interest
Ports & Terminals
Port AuthoritiesContainerBulkBreakbulk/General CargoRo-Ro/AutomotiveGTOs
Cargo Handling Equipment
STS CranesYard CranesMobile CHERo-Ro EquipmentBreakbulk EquipmentLow ThroughputBulk Handling Equipment
Shipping & Logistics
Container ShippingBreakbulk/General CargoRo-Ro ShippingDry Bulk ShippingLiquid cargoesLogistics
ICT
TOSPlanning & Optimisation TechnologyWiFiMobile ComputingPort Community SystemsAsset Tracking & Monitoring
Automation
Automated EquipmentGate AutomationRemote ControlProcess Automation
Multimodal
RailInland WaterwaysShortsea ShippingRoadAir-Cargo
Container Industry
Container manufactureContainer leasingRepair/StorageTradingConversion/Innovation
Refrigeration
Operations/TransportContainer leasingEquipmentM&R/Storage
Breakbulk
General cargoProject Cargo/Heavy LiftForest productsRo-Ro/AutomotiveAgribulks
Safety & Security
InsuranceHazardous cargoLashings/SecuringLegal/Regulatory
Civil Engineering
Port & terminal construction/designCivil & Consulting EngineersDredging & ReclamationMooring & FenderingLightingPaving & Surfacing
Environment
Business
InsuranceLegal/RegulatoryAppointments/PeopleMergers/Acquisitions/RestructuringFinance/Financial ResultsTrade & Professional AssociationsBusiness/Commerce Miscellaneous
 View all Topics View all Topics A-Z
More View all Topics View all Topics A-Z

You are viewing 1 of your 1 guest articles


register  or  login  for full access to online news

Dutch looking to 32m long trucks

The Dutch Ministry for Infrastructure and Water Management is looking to allows tests of road rigs with 32m overall length

Linked InTwitterFacebookeCard

The Ministry (Rijkswaterstaat) has confirmed that industry is interested in 32m long road trains, which would allow for two 13.6m long trailers, as opposed to 7.8m + 13.6m for 25.25m long gigaliners, but did not provide details.

 

However, Frank Verhoeven, CEO of Vos Logistics, told BNR Nieuwsradio that Rijkswaterstaat is planning to organise tests. Verhoeven supports this and Vos Logistics already operates a 32m rig in Sweden and is a leading operator of 25.25m long "ecocombi" rigs in the Netherlands.

 

The Netherlands has been at the forefront of the drive for longer trucks in mainland Europe, in order to optimise road transport. The first Nordic-style 25.25m long rigs were tested on Dutch motorways in 2001, but it took another 10 years for permits to be issued to Dutch road hauliers.

 

While 25.25m long gigaliners/eco-combis have been legal in the Netherlands for several years, border crossings to Belgium and Luxembourg still require a special permit. Long-term tests are under way in Belgium’s Flanders Province (Antwerp, Zeebrugge, Ghent and Ostend sea ports) and the concept has been gaining acceptance in Germany in the past few years.

Linked InTwitterFacebookeCard

You may also be interested in...

JV boost for Shanghai

Sibre/EMG for ADT

VTG introduces rCE Powerpack

China and Nepal agree transit trade deal

Chinese operators march offshore

Primorsk development plan

Related Stories

Dachser deploys gigaliners in Czech Republic

In the Czech Republic, Dachser recently started circulating two 25.25m long giga...

Trams for urban freight

In Germany, the confessional trade union association (CGB - Christlicher Gewerks...

3 Dees Transport opts for Krone container chassis

Port of Tilbury-based 3 Dees Transport has added six Krone Box Liner container c...

Nairobi backs down on SGR decree

The government of Kenya has backtracked on a recent decree that all cargo import...
Linked In
Twitter