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Record year for ABP Ipswich

ABP’s Port of Ipswich has reported 2017 as a record-breaking year, which saw the port handle the highest tonnage levels of cargo for Brett Aggregates since 2000

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ABP says that its 17-year tonnage milestone of just over 421,690 tonnes was achieved thanks to its programme of continuous investment in port infrastructure and equipment, together with Brett Aggregates’ investment in a new processing plant and rail capacity at the port. The 2017 figure was up by 90,361 tonnes on 2016, or 27% year on year.

Brett Aggregates operates a terminal within the River Orwell port where marine-dredged aggregates arrive by ship from East Coast UK offshore sites. Material is stored and processed on site for delivery to customers by road, rail or sea for use in concrete manufacture and other construction projects in and around the Capital.

Adam Smith, General Manager, Brett Aggregates-Eastern, commented: “These improvements have increased our annual capacity and further strengthens our ability to respond to demand as opportunities arise. Our team on site and our close relationship with the team at ABP has been key to delivering the upgrades.”

Other highlights in 2017 included ABP Ipswich and Brett Aggregates winning the Rail Freight Group’s Community and Environmental Responsibility Award for their work in developing a new rail-based flow from the Port of Ipswich to London Concrete in Watford. The new rail flow has brought significant environmental and community benefits when compared with road transport.

Since January 2016, almost 100,000 tonnes of product have been transported by rail as a result of this project, representing more than 20% of Brett Aggregates’ throughput at the Port of Ipswich. Each 1,100-tonne trainload removes nearly 40 lorry movements from the UK road system. Delivering this volume would have meant nearly 750,000 road miles, some 46,000 miles each month.

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