Port of Greenock introduces new Türkiye service, invests in STS cranes

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The Port of Greenock secures a new weekly container service linking Scotland and Türkiye, while the port’s owner, Peel Ports, is investing in two new ship-to-shore cranes.

The Port of Greenock has been awarded a new weekly deep-sea container service that will directly connect Scotland to the Mediterranean market of Türkiye.

The new call on the Mediterranean Shipping Company’s Türkiye-to-and-from-UK West Coast service is an extension of the existing service, which already calls at the Port of Liverpool.

The addition of the Port of Greenock to the route is a seal of approval of the Port’s market-leading offering, consolidated by owner Peel Ports’ recent GBP 25m investment in two new ship-to-shore cranes, capable of servicing larger post-panamax container vessels.

The extension of the route presents a compelling option for direct sea connectivity for exporters and importers, to and from Scotland. The MSC Freeport arrived at the port on Monday as part of the weekly service, before departing on Tuesday night.

The new service rotation, which also includes Spain, Portugal and France, will significantly enhance sea-borne connectivity from Scotland to the Far East, India and Pakistan, with reliable direct mother vessel-to-mother vessel transhipment connection in Sines, and will further support decarbonisation of the supply chain.

The new service will provide a boost for Scottish exports, including commodities such as whisky and other alcohol types and plastics, as well as significant imports of food, packaging materials and manufactured products.

Jim McSporran, Port Director at Peel Ports Clydeport, said: “It’s fantastic to have this vote of confidence in the Port of Greenock, and we look forward to welcoming this game-changing new service to Scotland. This direct call will increase trade between Scotland and Turkey, while also providing enhanced UK west coast connectivity, as well as connectivity to the more distant markets in the US and Asia. It will also serve to reduce both transit times and carbon emissions in the supply chain, to and from Scotland.”

“Our GBP 25m investment in two new cranes, which will be fully operational later this year, is the largest single investment in the terminal since it opened in 1969. These modern and technologically advanced cranes will not only significantly increase operational efficiency and productivity in the Port, but will also increase our capability to service bigger post-panamax vessels. With 17m higher and 7.5m longer outreach than the current cranes, we will be able to service significantly higher on-deck stowage and broader beam,” added McSporran.

Two cranes were ordered from Liebherr in 2022. The cranes are 39.3 m high, with a capacity of 45 t, an outreach of 45.6 m, and a 16.76 m rail span. The cranes have been manufactured and are at the Port of Cork awaiting delivery.

Two new cranes are to be called Craner Swift and U-Crane Bolt after a pair of creative schoolkids won the chance to name the huge structures. The pair were chosen as joint winners after local pupils were asked to find the most imaginative names for the vital pieces of infrastructure. The port owner Peel Ports Clydeport ran the competition in partnership with Inverclyde Council.

The location of the port is of strategic importance to major importers and exporters and, as Scotland’s leading west coast container terminal, the port is responsible for the safe handling of a throughput of 100,000 TEU a year.

The west-facing freight port has been at the heart of Scotland’s shipping industry since 1876.

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